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fuckyeahcameraporn:

Braun Nizo S560, Zeiss Ikon Nettar, Fujifilm X100s, Asahi Pentax Spotmatic, Honeywell Pentax H1a, Fujifilm X20, iPhone 5s with Moment Wide Lens, Joby Micro250 Tripod, Studio Neat Glif, Contour Grip

fuckyeahcameraporn:

Braun Nizo S560, Zeiss Ikon Nettar, Fujifilm X100s, Asahi Pentax Spotmatic, Honeywell Pentax H1a, Fujifilm X20, iPhone 5s with Moment Wide Lens, Joby Micro250 Tripod, Studio Neat Glif, Contour Grip

GIF: 

"Still images can contain stories…the mind and emotions can become engaged by looking at a still image and small stories can grow into huge stories. It depends, of course, on the viewer." David Lynch

Lumu and Sony F65.

Lumu and Sony F65.

thinkwingman:

Take Better Pictures This Year With The Lumu

It’s 2014, resolutions have been made, and some already broken. This year make a commitment to capturing the moments of your life with stunning photos.

It can be easy to get lost in the world of camera gadgets and accessories. Instead of adding an extra, bulky accessory to your camera bag, why not just download an App. Lumu is a combination application and small headphone jack compatible light meter. About the size of a quarter, Lumu brings the light meter into the 21st century. Lumu is compatible with both iPhone and Andrioid, and is designed  to unleash the abilities of photographers. The device plugs directly into your smarphone’s headphone jack, giving you a precise and easy to use light meter. The App allows you to view the light levels of a specific area, and then adjust your camera setting accordingly.

Introduction to light metering

Light meters are light sensing devices that are good at quantifying light. They help you to create well-exposed photograph. 

We know two variations: reflected or incident light meters.

Reflected light meters
They measure the light reflected by the scene to be photographed. All in-camera meters are reflected-light meters. They are calibrated to show the appropriate exposure for “average” scenes. Which has some limitations. For instance, badly underexposed sunset photos are common exactly because of this effect as the brightness of the sun fools the camera’s light meter.

Incident light metering

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An incident meter  meters the light source itself. It does not point at or see the subject, so it does not matter if the subject is white or black, the light meters the same. Black things will come out black and white things will come out white.

You make a reading by holding the meter right up to the subject so that its sensor points in the direction of the camera. In this way, you measure the intensity of the light falling on the subject from the camera’s point of view.
If you’re not close enough to hold the sensor up to the subject, simply hold it above you with the sensor pointing backwards over your shoulder. As long as you and the subject are in the same light, everything will be fine.

Practical example

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First photograph, camera set to Auto Measuring Mode: subject is underexposed due to extremely bright background.

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Second photograph, measured with Lumu (at the marked point): subject is correctly exposed.

Incident light meter reads the amount of light illuminating the subject, not light reflected from the subject, so the meter ignores the subject and background characteristics.

This makes incident type of metering be independent of the subject and it’s colors, and therefore, directly reading the incident light is more nearly always “correct”, regardless of subject (dark things come out dark, and bright colors things come out bright).  

Averaging multiple incident light measurements

Sometimes we take photographs at the places with extreme high contrast, where one measurement (incident or reflected type) isn’t enough for the most acceptable exposure. 
That’s when we take multiple measurements across the place and calculate the middle point between them:

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First photograph: measured at the shadow.

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Second photograph: measured at the illuminated part of the scene.

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Third photograph: Lumu calculated middle point between both measurements. The resulting photograph is the best compromise between very dark and bright parts of the scene.

observationpoint:

Unboxing my new Lumu light meter for iPhone.

Lumu low light test shooting, using final pre-production Lumu light meter. camera: Fujifilm X-Pro1 lens: Fujinon 18mm aperture: f/2,2 time: 30 seconds ISO: 1600  General light level: 0.04 lux Photograph was captured in the first attempt.
Check full gallery.

Lumu low light test shooting, using final pre-production Lumu light meter.
camera: Fujifilm X-Pro1
lens: Fujinon 18mm
aperture: f/2,2
time: 30 seconds
ISO: 1600
General light level: 0.04 lux

Photograph was captured in the first attempt.

Check full gallery.

Lumu app sneak peek. Coming into the App Store and Google Play in one week.

Lumu app sneak peek. Coming into the App Store and Google Play in one week.